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Nuclear energy, Cambodia’s opposition, illegal cash flow

Hello Globe readers,

Returning from the region’s solar new year celebrations soaking wet from water fights and covered in baby powder smeared by festive strangers, the Globe is back with another round of feature stories and analysis.

First, Vietnam is weighing the value of nuclear power, seeking to increase its energy supply while reducing fossil fuel reliance, Govi Snell reported. But there is limited public support for nuclear energy due to lingering safety concerns and the high price tag of establishing the necessary infrastructure.

In Cambodia, the Candlelight Party is the preferred energy source for opposition supporters heading into the June commune elections. But candidates are in a tough position as they navigate a repressive political arena in which errors could lead to bans or arrests, Fiona Kelliher reported. 

While Cambodia’s opposition politicians push for reforms, money laundering still runs rampant in the Kingdom by way of cash transactions in the real estate and casino industries, Ashley Yeong reported. The government has implemented regulations to crack down, but actual enforcement remains weak.

As rumours of potential chemical warfare swirl around Russia’s ongoing war against Ukraine, contributor Stein Tønnesson looked back on the history of U.S. chemical weapons deployed during the Vietnam War and how the international community failed to act on reports of criminal use of defoliants including Agent Orange.

To better prepare for severe weather conditions in Southeast Asia, fleets of unmanned surface vessels could be the future of data gathering by enabling more precise weather predictions, contributor Troy Kippen wrote. However, the technology needs refining to reach its full potential.

That’s all for this week, please enjoy the articles.

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