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Introducing our podcast’s second season!

We’ve had a strong week here and, as part of that, I’m very happy to be able to introduce Season 2 of the Anakut podcast. The podcast has been a main focus these past few weeks and I believe that work has created a strong series for you all — I’m excited to hear what you think of it.

But before we get too much into that, we have some Globe updates. We’re in the final stages of our first major fundraiser, which will officially come to a close in mid-July. If you haven’t already, please do consider pitching in to help us fund more journalism, more podcasts and more special projects. In short, your donations help us do all the things that make us the Globe and, hopefully, have brought some value to your life. Hit the link in the text above to learn more at our fundraising page.

I also want to take a moment here to make a bit of a personal announcement. I’ll be moving on from my position at the Globe in a few weeks time once we finish up production of Anakut. Though I’ll miss the team, I’ll still be here in Cambodia so you might very well see me cropping back up in Globe-world from time to time. That said, this is likely one of the last editions of weekly editorial you’ll be getting from me (which is devastating news, I’m sure!) so I truly hope you’ve enjoyed our time together in this editorial. I know I have.

But enough from me! Let’s get to the features.

First off, we have the promised very first episode of Anakut, Season 2, in which we give a big shoutout to Pride month and explore LGBTQ+ subjects in Cambodia. This season is co-hosted by me and Toch Thina, a reporter at our Khmer-language partner publication Focus: Ready for Tomorrow. Keep an eye out for seven more episodes to follow!

Back to our text features, we have a big money story from Globe reporter Kiana Duncan. Despite having relatively small economies, Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar are packing impressive fintech industries that have permeated most aspects of everyday life. How did this happen? Kiana explores that question with this deep-diving feature.

Staying in that economic theme, foreign workers in Vietnam are now scrambling to keep their visa status in the wake of a recently implemented decree that promises to close an era of easy access. Globe reporter Govi Snell got the details on the decree and what it means for Vietnam’s tens of thousands of foreign workers — as well as for the country’s self-image as an emerging power.

We rounded out the week with two very different pieces from the political realm. Last year, youth activists in Thailand took to the streets in historic numbers to demand a true democratic transition. But if the crowds at their most recent demonstration are any indicator, today their movement has dwindled to just a shadow of its former strength. Globe reporter Wanpen Pajai spoke with activists and researchers to hear whether the protestors can strike a new spark.

Finally, as one of the first foreign editors of the New Light, the official print newspaper mouthpiece of the Myanmar military, Jessica Mudditt got a rare view behind the curtain of a propaganda machine. Last year, Jessica published those experiences in her book, titled Our Home in Myanmar: Four Years in Yangon, of which she has generously provided an excerpt here. Very interesting reading, be sure not to miss this one.

And that’s it! Thanks for reading with us and come back on Monday to start another week with the Globe.

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